It seems like the world is waking up to the resurgence of Pepsi Blue and everyone wants to get their hands in it. But there are a few things that you should stop and consider before guzzling down this drink that is curiously colored like no other food in nature. We will have a closer look at what is in blue food coloring and how is it made? Please keep in mind that you may find this alarming.

The blue dye in question that we will take a look at if known as FD&C Blue No. 1, or ‘Brilliant Blue’ and listed as E133 on food packagings. This is the blue that you find in all sorts of candy, sodas, Popsicles, frosting, bakery items, some liqueur items such as Blue Curaçao and more. This same blue is also found in many other types of products, including hair dye and personal care products. Given that it is in things all around us, it is a responsible course of action for you to consider where it comes from.

Where does blue food dye come from?

FD&C Blue No. 1, originally made from coal tar, is now manufactured from an oil base by most companies. That’s not to say that all are using more modern approaches to making this product. Some are still using cola tar, which has a range of concerns associated to it. Some will say that the modern process offers no evidence that there are any concerns with the toxicology, however, these are not conclusive, and there are legal limitations on how much Blue No. 1 can be added to foods in Europe. This is the blue coloring that is used in Pepsi Blue.

If food products were honestly labeledWhen you stop and look at what is in blue food coloring, particularly the traditional FD&C Blue No. 1, the list is more than a little troubling. FD&C Blue No. 1 of this type is known to include high concentrations of mercury, lead, and fluoride. Studies have shown that this dye is able to absorb into the bloodstream very quickly through the tongue, which is where you will most likely see it after a child has been drinking Pepsi Blue, or sucking on a blue candy or Popsicle.

Image source: www.NaturalNews.com, Cartoon Creator Mike Adams. As humorous as this cartoon is, the types of food additives and preservatives we are exposed to is staggering. Take some time to learn about how you can make safer and healthier decisions about what you bring into your home.

This type of FD&C Blue No. 1 made from coal tar is believed to have links with causing Leukemia, Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and Multiple Myeloma. As reported in USA Today on the 16th of June 2013, concerns around cancer and exposure to cola tar driveways proved to be a significant concern. So, if there are worries about coal tar being used on driveways, is it safe to put products made from this into your body? With the FDA issuing a Public Health Advisory to warn people about this, I’d rater not…

Is there any other blue food coloring around?

FD&C Blue No. 1 is not the only blue that you will come across. There are a few different shades of blue, and the next one after Blue No. 1 is coincidentally Blue No. 2, listed as E132. Blue No. 2 is known as ‘Indigotine’ and is the synthetic version Indigo, originally a plant-based dye which has an extensive history of being used to dye textiles.

To say that a product which has natural origins is enough of a basis to deem it safe for consumption is irresponsible. Not all things which are naturally occurring are safe to consume. Take for example strychnine, which has dire effects for people and is used as rat poison. Depending upon where you live, different food dyes may or may not be legal for use in foods.

What is in blue food coloring that could be linked to cancer?

The CSPI (Center for Science in the Public Interest) conducted a range of studies into the health impacts associated with blue food coloring. The synthetic Blue No. 2 was found to have connections with cancer developing in the brains of male rats under laboratory tests. Despite the US FDA stating that this is not harmful to humans,a and permitting its use in a broad range of products, the CSPI is steadfast in their findings and beliefs that Blue No. 2 is not to be considered safe for humans to consume.

Uncovering more about what is in blue food coloring and how is it made is a valuable part in your journey to understanding what is around you. What are some of the blue foods and drinks you have noticed in your home? What are your thoughts on consuming foods or drinks that have been dyed blue? Do you plan to take steps to get them out of your diet and cleanse your digestive system?

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